Old Capitol Farmers Market

Springfield’s longest-running and most popular Farmers Market in beautiful #downtown Springfield. Open between May-October 8 a.m. -12:30 p.m.

Lincoln Half Marathon

Join us on the first Saturday of April as runners from many states and countries take in Abraham Lincoln sites during this scenic half marathon. This USATF certified course will immerse you in Lincoln history unlike any other race!

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at the Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Downtown Springfield.

The parade starts on Jefferson & 6th heading west to 5th; Heading south on 5th to Capitol; Heading North on 6th to the Reviewing Stand, (this is our Family Friendly Area) then to Washington heading east, back to the beginning; the Horace Mann parking lot.

Talking history at Lincoln Presidential Library

The Illinois History Forum returns to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in 2018 with sessions on Lincoln, Lewis and Clark, Ronald Reagan and Ulysses S. Grant. Topics during the state’s bicentennial year will also include former capital city Vandalia during Lincoln’s time, the history of Springfield’s many colorful signs, and Chicago during the Great Migration.

What the Comp Plan Says About Downtown

Rather than attempting to stamp suburbia on our historic downtown as previous comprehensive plans did, “Forging a New Legacy,” Springfield’s new comprehensive plan, allows the community to recognize the uniqueness of each area and the opportunities (and challenges) that go with that uniqueness.

Can Springfield forge ahead with vision as the title of the newest comprehensive plan supposes? Only time will tell.

The plan, now available for public review, makes long-overdue and much-needed updates to the most recent version from 2000.

Although this new plan includes major transportation arterials that were described in previous versions (a strong nod toward outward growth), it does attempt to help steer our focus and attention back toward the center.

“Forging a New Legacy” highlights an increasingly relevant issue: rate of growth. The plan projects that Springfield will grow at around 10 percent over 20 years, or one-half of one percent per year. This conservative (and likely realistic) view on the rate of growth is important because it draws our attention back to preserving what the plan refers to as “legacy neighborhoods.”

By preserving legacy neighborhoods, the costs to city government do not rise as sharply over time (increased roadway maintenance, fire protection coverage, sewerage, etc.). The call for neighborhood master plans, including (and especially) in the central business district, is an opportunity for Springfield to address smaller details that are not necessarily at issue in other parts of the city.

In a similar vein, the comprehensive plan also includes direction for what it calls “special areas,” as well as proposed “opportunities.” These special areas should demand a greater focus, and the authors recognize that additional details must be worked out in accordance with some general principles set forth in the overall plan.

Also of interest to fans of downtown — the plan makes the assumption that railroad relocation will occur and that Third Street will ultimately be transformed into a greenway.

The public is welcome to comment on the plan until Thursday, November 16. Then it goes to the city council for formal adoption. You can access the plan (and other relevant documents) at www.springfield.il.us/Businesses/2037CompPlan.aspx.

This post was written by Steven Simpson Black, who runs his own small business while earning a planning degree from UIS.

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